16 February 2006

Paper Craft for Beginners Video


I just finished doing a beginners video that demonstrates how paper models are done. This was shot with a web cam so pardon the quality. The original video was 1.4GB, then I compressed it to 64MB, and then another, that ended up at 19.4MB using the Xvid codec. That's the smallest size I can encode the video without compromising the quality too much. The paper model I used in this demo is the Kabuki Bear by Moichi.



Kabuki Bear - Download - http://www.boreas.dti.ne.jp/~moichi/

On the following days and weeks to come, I will also do instructional videos on other paper crafts and origami, so just stay tuned for that.

Before I begin explaining this video, please note that all of this notes are based on my personal experiences and that technique varies from person to person.

Part 1 - Cutting - This is really the simplest part but you should also be careful at the same time, try to look at the entirety of the model before you start cutting, note that I did not use the cutter for this project, In my experience in paper crafting I have seldomly used the cutter for cutting the outlines of the models, I mainly used narrow tip scissors for all of this. I do however use the cutters if there is something to be remove or cut from inside of the paper model and for very minute detailing. Once you have cut the paper models, its time to move on to. . .

Part 2 - Folding and Creasing - This part can either be really easy or really difficult depending on the paper model, there are three techniques that you should be familiar with when doing paper crafts, the mountain fold, valley fold, and tubulars. ( I will be doing a demo on this in my next video). When folding you should learn to use your power of observation and visualize at the same time to enable you to easily determine which part goes together.

Part 3 - Gluing and Assembling - After you've folded and creased the parts this is where visualization comes handy, once you've figured out how to put them together, start putting a small amount of glue on the glue tab. The best to determine if you've put the right amount of glue is when you press the glued surfaces and no glue comes out. After you've glued and assembled them together, relax, pat yourself in the back and enjoy your new paper craft model.

Tip: If your hand starts sweating, make sure you dry them real well before continuing, you don't want to smear the ink on your paper model.


15 comments:

  1. Halo, cool site you got there, when is the next video coming? If you planning to sell some paper craft please visit my site www.etsy.com, i think you may find it interesting.

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  2. Thanks for the comments, I'm still working on the new video content, expect to see it within this week. With regards to selling some paper craft, I'm still in the process of creating my own paper models, but If I do decide to sell some of them, I would definitely consider your site.

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  3. Thank you so much for making this! Your blog does a great job of sharing what you're doing with others interested in the paper craft, but a video takes it to the next level.

    Good luck with videos to come, and thanks again!

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  4. Farouch ExegeteMarch 29, 2006 3:44 PM

    Interesting video. Might I suggest, like the old silent films, that some captioning would be good--like, what were the sticks you used to apply glue, paper strips? A caption might be: "Apply glue sparingly using small paper or cardboard strips" And how did you go about creasing the model? Did you use a ruler and thumb, or ruler and knife crease technique? And you use what I call the "parallel" cutting technique, that leaves cutting the tab short ends for the final bit of cutting, rather than go once around the model cutting every edge. All would be useful for beginners to know. I've never seen a demonstration, and think it's a good idea, and the quality was fine considering it was done with a web camera.

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  5. Thanks very much for the advise, this video was really just a sampler and not a complete tutorial, I'm in the process of refining my video techniques and acquiring a better video camera for my first full tutorial. So stay tuned for that.

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  6. Nicely executed video, very easy to follow! The music, however, tied everything together amazingly. Who was that? The song is still echoing in my head!

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  7. that music was the soundtrack to "Requiem for a Dream"

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  8. Nice Tutorial/video. And Nice site too.
    Keep up the good work.

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    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
  12. that video was very helpful, and the music...wow. I have the soundtrack of requiem for a dream but that song isnt on it, ive never seen the movie, so i have no idea what part its from. If anyone knows that would be great thanks

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  13. I could have sworn that music was actually from the movie Amelie...

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  14. I've recently stumbled upon this site through Kotaku. I'm so impressed with everything this hobby can produce that I've taken up papercrafting myself. This video was a great lesson for someone like me. Only problem I had was determining if the line I was folding was a mountian or a valley.

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  15. Thanks for visiting our site, were glad that we've inspired you to take up papercrafting. With regards to the folds, there's really no standard rule that papercrafters follow, it will depend on the maker of the pattern. The typical valley fold is always symbolized by a "dashed line", while the mountain fold can be a "dash-dot" line or dashed line with greater gaps in between.

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